Celebrating and Promoting High Educational Standards in Health Care

St Christopher’s was delighted to hold an awards evening on Tuesday 1 December 2015 to recognise the success of students who have been studying at St Christopher’s internationally-renowned palliative and end of life care Education Centre in Sydenham, South East London. The students, who comprised social care and health staff from local care homes, the Royal Hospital Chelsea and from the hospice itself, received a range of awards including City & Guilds vocational qualifications and the Care Certificate.

The students receiving the Care Certificate are the first students to have completed newly created course The Care Certificate (Cavendish) from St Christopher’s, which has been given City & Guilds accreditation for its high teaching standards and assessment rigour.

The Care Certificate was introduced nationally in April this year in the wake of the Cavendish Review. The review determined that staff new to a career in care should all receive a comprehensive induction, reflected in the 15 standards that the Care Certificate encompasses. The aim is to ensure that all new staff who are new to care are equipped with the knowledge and skills to provide high quality, compassionate care. St Christopher’s Education Centre is proud to be one of the first training organisations to be accredited by an awarding organisation for its teaching and assessment of the Care Certificate.

Liz Bryan, Director of Education from St Christopher’s says, “Making certain that everyone who is entering the health care profession for the first time is trained to a recognised standard matters to all of us. It’s critical to know that people, who are often at a very vulnerable time in their lives, are cared for with compassion and skill. Our training at St Christopher’s ensures that high standards are met, whether the health care worker is employed at a care home, a hospital, in the community or a hospice.”

St Christopher’s was delighted that Kay Fawcett OBE, who led the development of the Care Certificate, presented certificates to the successful learners.

 Kay Fawcett comments, “Education and development is crucial to maintain skilled and motivated teams, and the Care Certificate plays a small but important part in the learner’s journey.   I’m delighted to see that St Christopher’s has taken the standards of the Care Certificate and used them not only to develop and value their staff but to ensure that this development makes a difference to the care that is delivered to the people it serves”.

 In addition, Paul Robottom, Advisor for Health and Care at City & Guilds presented City & Guilds Level 3 Certificate in Assessing Vocational Achievement certificates; a nationally recognised qualification in assessment that equips those who achieve it with the ability to assess staff performance and knowledge.

Tracey Nelson, from Nightingale House in Balham, who was presented with a Care Certificate at last night’s ceremony said: “The course was really interesting – there was so much helpful information and I learnt so much. It was hard work but worth it – my assessor spurred me on when things got tough. I love my work and am really glad I had the opportunity to do the course so I can make sure I give our residents the best care.”

In the last quarter this year alone, St Christopher’s Education Centre has or is supporting 300 students on vocational courses in the health and care field.

Education is a core value at St Christopher’s and the hospice – which celebrates its 50th anniversary in 2017 – is committed to developing the ability of health and care staff to deliver the best care possible; locally in South East London, nationally, and internationally. Last year St Christopher’s reached nearly 2,000 people through educational events.

"I love my work and am really glad I had the opportunity to do the course so I can make sure I give our residents the best care.”

Tracey Nelson, from Nightingale House in Balham