Physician Associate Introduction to Palliative Care Community of Practice

Quality End of Life Care for All (QELCA) Train the Trainer Programme

This introductory programme is for physician associates with an interest in furthering their knowledge and skills in palliative care.

This is the first palliative care programme in the UK specifically tailored to physician associates.

This community of practice will consist of four afternoon sessions, providing an opportunity for developing communication skills and networking. The first three sessions will be via Zoom and the last session in-person at St Christopher’s CARE in Sydenham.

The four sessions will focus on:

  • An introduction to palliative care
  • Symptom control and psychological support
  • End of life care including recognising dying and anticipatory medicines
  • Communication skills involving scenarios

Who is it for?

This community of practice is open to physician associates either working in palliative care or primary care within the boroughs served by St. Christopher’s Hospice.

CPD accreditation from the FPA (Faculty of Physician Associates) pending

The global learning objectives for this community are to:

  • Understand the core principles of palliative care, including symptom management, communication, and holistic patient care.
  • Reflect on personal attitudes and biases related to death, dying, and end-of-life care, and develop a compassionate and empathetic approach towards patients and their families.
Philippa Guppy

Philippa Guppy

Philippa is a palliative care trainee in London, she combines her clinical role with her educational role as senior lecturer, chief OSCE examiner for the MPAS programme and chief examiner…
Read More Philippa Guppy
Chris Mangar

Chris Mangar

Chris is a Clinical Team Lead working for St Christopher’s in Bromley. He has worked in the community for many years and in specialist palliative care since 2011.  Chris combined holding…
Read More Chris Mangar

Rehabilitative Palliative Care Skills Workshop

Shakun Banfield

Rehabilitation in palliative care has been well established as a way of supporting people to live well until they die. But we know that it can be so much more than a visit from a physio or OT.

Rehabilitative palliative care encourages us to think about how each interaction we have with someone can enhance their quality of life.

In this workshop we will explore the principles of rehabilitation in a wider context and how we can use them to enhance our practice.

We will explore topics such as goal setting, movement, enablement and self-management.

What will I learn?

In this workshop we will look at practical ways in which you can support someone to be the best that they can be. We will explore the importance of language in our interactions and there will be some role play.

Also we’ll look at the importance of asking ‘What matters to you?’ and how we can use that to influence the care/support that we provide.

Participants will receive a certificate of attendance.

Who is it for?

This workshop is appropriate for all Nurses, Nursing Associates, Healthcare Assistants, Care Home Managers, Pharmacists and other allied health professionals looking to learn more about rehabilitative palliative care.

White woman with wavy brown hair smiling in a blue shirt.

Gail Preston

Gail has a wide ranging experience in Physiotherapy, coming to work at St Christopher’s in 2011. She has been involved in all aspects of Rehabilitation at St Christopher’s including developing the Living Well at Home Team (goal focused rehabilitation using volunteers). She was part of the Wellbeing team through recent COVID-19 pandemic, translating in-person services online and then back again in a new design. She is currently working clinically in outpatient rehab and as part of the Professional Learning team helping to deliver webinars, workshops, communities and the 2023 Multi Professional Academy week.
Read full profile Gail Preston

Learning Disabilities and Palliative Care Skills Workshop

Two people talking

How can we improve palliative care for people with learning disabilities?

This is an interactive session which aims to improve participants understanding of learning disabilities and how we can meet the needs of this patient group towards the end of life. It will include case studies and opportunity for Q&A.

Topics will include: supporting communication, decisions around hospital admissions, providing person-centred care and symptom assessment for this patient group. By the end of this session you will have improved confidence in supporting individuals with learning disabilities towards the end of life.

What will I learn?

This workshop will take place at St Christopher’s CARE in Sydenham.

Topics will include:

  • Advance care planning
  • Symptom assessment for people with learning disabilities
  • Communicating about death and illness.
  • Decisions around hospital admissions

Who is it for?

This workshop is appropriate for all Nurses, Nursing Associates, Healthcare Assistants, support workers, Care Home Managers and other allied health professionals looking to refresh their knowledge about learning disabilities in palliative care.

Phoebe Mooney

Phoebe Mooney 

Phoebe is a Clinical Nurse Specialist for people with learning disabilities working in palliative care at St Christopher’s Hospice. She has always had a special interest in palliative care and prior to her current role Phoebe worked as an advance care planning nurse for adults with LD in East London. Phoebe also has experience of working as a community learning disability nurse in both physical and mental health. Phoebe is passionate about improving the support people with learning disabilities receive at the end of life and enjoys teaching and raising awareness about this topic.
Read full profile Phoebe Mooney 
White woman with wavy brown hair smiling in a blue shirt.

Gail Preston

Gail has a wide ranging experience in Physiotherapy, coming to work at St Christopher’s in 2011. She has been involved in all aspects of Rehabilitation at St Christopher’s including developing the Living Well at Home Team (goal focused rehabilitation using volunteers). She was part of the Wellbeing team through recent COVID-19 pandemic, translating in-person services online and then back again in a new design. She is currently working clinically in outpatient rehab and as part of the Professional Learning team helping to deliver webinars, workshops, communities and the 2023 Multi Professional Academy week.
Read full profile Gail Preston

Supporting People at the End of Life: Scenarios Workshop

Scenario-based training to build confidence in managing a range of situations that may occur in the last days of life.

Participants will be able to practice skills such as assessment, decision making at the end of life and communicating with relatives. This workshop aims to provide a safe space, allowing professionals to experience what it might be like to care for someone at the end of life, encouraging them to feel more confident to do this in their place of work.

Participants will be grouped depending on experience to ensure they have training that is relevant to their current level of expertise.

What will I learn?

Topics will include:

  • Building confidence to care for someone at the end of life
  • Communication skills
  • Discussion of cultural differences with regards to end of life care
  • Supporting someone who has been bereaved

This workshop will take place at St Christopher’s CARE in Sydenham.

Who is it for?

The course is appropriate for all Nurses, Nursing Associates, Healthcare Assistants, Care Home Managers and other allied health professionals looking to refresh their knowledge about end of life care.

Karen Duckworth

Karen Duckworth

Karen is a Clinical Nurse Specialist at St Christopher’s Hospice, caring for those at end of life in the Bromley community.  She has recently started a secondment within CARE as a visiting lecturer and facilitates the ECHOs for Bromley and Croydon mental health and learning disability homes.  Karen has worked as a palliative care nurse since 2014. Her experience includes both community and in-patient settings. She has had the privilege to work with many patients, and their families, as they face life-limiting illness. For Karen, the holistic nature of palliative care work has driven her passion for the specialty. Karen enjoys sharing…
Read full profile Karen Duckworth

Communication Skills Workshop

The skills to navigate sensitive conversations are vital when working with patients towards the end of life. This practical workshop will offer participants the opportunity to develop their communication skills.

You will consider situations in which sensitive communication is necessary, both by phone and in person. Participants will use the skills introduced in the session to practice in real time. The workshops will be split into a number of stations with different scenarios and activities.

Participants will be given the opportunity to reflect on their experiences in the workshop and how they might apply what they have learned in their own settings.

What will I learn?

Topics will include:

  • Verbal and non-verbal communication
  • Responding to distress
  • Active listening
  • Overcoming barriers to communication

This workshop will take place at St Christopher’s CARE  in Sydenham.

Who is it for?

The course is appropriate for all Nurses, Nursing Associates, Healthcare Assistants, Care Home Managers, Pharmacists and other allied health professionals looking to refresh their knowledge about communication.

Karen Duckworth

Karen Duckworth

Karen is a Clinical Nurse Specialist at St Christopher’s Hospice, caring for those at end of life in the Bromley community.  She has recently started a secondment within CARE as a visiting lecturer and facilitates the ECHOs for Bromley and Croydon mental health and learning disability homes.  Karen has worked as a palliative care nurse since 2014. Her experience includes both community and in-patient settings. She has had the privilege to work with many patients, and their families, as they face life-limiting illness. For Karen, the holistic nature of palliative care work has driven her passion for the specialty. Karen enjoys sharing…
Read full profile Karen Duckworth

Creative Arts and Improving Care Workshop

Art materials on table

How can the creative arts improve the care we give to people with a life-limiting diagnosis and at the end of life?

This workshop will seek to provide answers to this question. Creative therapy can have an important role in responding to people’s spiritual and psychological distress. The workshop offers participants the opportunity to learn more about the different creative arts therapies offered here at St Christopher’s.

You’ll have the opportunity to discover how these therapies have been used in palliative care. The workshop will also encourage you to consider how elements of these therapies might be used in your own setting.

What will I learn?

Topics will include:

  • What is music and art therapy
  • Creating a safe space for self-expression
  • An opportunity to ask questions of an experienced therapist

This workshop will take place at St Christopher’s CARE in Sydenham.

The course is appropriate for all Nurses, Nursing Associates, Healthcare Assistants, Care Home Managers, Therapists and other Allied Health Professionals looking to learn more about how creative arts could be implemented within their workplace.

Mandy Bruce headshot

Mandy Bruce

Mandy leads the Psychological and Spiritual Care team at St Christopher’s. As an Art Psychotherapist, she combines therapeutic creative process with contemplative care in order to be fully present with…
Read More Mandy Bruce

Heart Failure Community of Practice

We are inviting anyone with an interest in the care of those living with and dying from heart failure to join our community of practice.

This is an online community, bringing together individuals and teams to share knowledge and experiences in a supportive and inclusive environment, with the aim of enhancing the experiences of life, death, dying and loss for those with heart failure and their families, friends and carers.

This will be an interactive series of 6 topics including case based discussions and teaching from people working in the fields of heart failure and palliative care.  Please do sign up and join our community and bring examples of practice which we can support with and all learn together.

What will I learn?

There are 6 online sessions in total.

All online sessions:

Wednesday 24th January3.00 – 4.30pmLikely trajectory
Tuesday 13th February12.30 – 2.00pmMeaningful conversations
Wednesday 6th March3.00 – 4.30pmSymptom management in heart failure
Wednesday 10th April3.00 – 4.30pmSymptom management EOL in heart failure
Wednesday 8th May3.00 – 4.30pmICDs
Tuesday 11th June12.30 – 2.00pmChanging focus of rehabilitation

Wednesday 6th March: Symptom management in heart failure

Who is it for?

  • Palliative care teams
  • Heart failure teams
  • Clinicians working in either specialty
  • Primary care colleagues
  • Clinicians working in complex care or rapid response teams
  • Clinicians working in urgent care

What will this community look like?

As part of an ongoing project to enhance the palliative care experiences of people living with and dying from heart failure, we want to build a community of practice to help engage professionals, recognise the unique needs of this group of people and consider ways together to create person centred and integrated care across disciplines, organisations and specialties.

By attending this community of practice you will:

  • Be aware of the palliative care needs of people living with and dying from heart failure with an increased understanding of when to refer to palliative care services.
  • Be confident in basic symptom management arising from advancing heart failure.
  • Know more about how to optimise quality of life for people living with heart failure.
  • Be prepared to engage in courageous and sensitive conversations about future care options and decisions.
  • Be clear about timing and approach for challenging conversations and decisions related to deactivation of ICDs and similar.

Isobel Jackson

Isobel is a palliative heart failure advanced practitioner at St Christopher’s and has worked in palliative care for approximately eight years and supporting people living with heart failure for three of those years. Her background is mostly in community palliative care but also acute and intensive care.
Read full profile Isobel Jackson
Joy Ross

Dr Joy Ross

Consultant in Palliative Medicine, St Christopher’s Dr Joy Ross trained at Guy’s and St Thomas’ Medical School. She completed her PhD at Imperial College, London, studying the pharmacogenetics of response to opioids. She has worked as a Palliative Care Consultant at St Joseph’s Hospice, London and then at the Royal Marsden and Royal Brompton Palliative Care Service. She is currently working at St Christopher’s Hospice with a specialist interest in developing palliative care services for the frail elderly and those with non-malignant disease including heart failure
Read full profile Dr Joy Ross
Fiona Hodson

Fiona Hodson

Consultant Nurse Fiona trained at Guy’s and St Thomas’. She initially worked at St Christopher’s Hospice with Dame Cicely Saunders. She then specialised in cardiology for 26 years including setting up cardiac rehab services, running cardiac support groups and as a valvular research nurse. She then worked as a heart failure CNS both in hospital and running clinics in GP practices. In 2005 she was part of a joint research project between palliative care and cardiology, exploring the palliative care needs of heart failure patients. She then moved to work as a community palliative care CNS at Guys. In 2017…
Read full profile Fiona Hodson

Collaborating with Communities: Transforming End of Life Experiences Together

Illustration of a group of people together from different backgrounds and ethnicities.

Are you interested in changing the way you work with local communities but not sure where to start?

Do you need support in making the case for working differently?

Growing awareness of end of life inequalities and the role that communities do and can play in end of life support has led to an NHS Ambition being one which asks the community to be prepared to care.

But what does that actually mean? Are we asking people to help out the health system for free, or can we achieve a greater change? How should healthcare organisations change to better collaborate in community settings?

Join us for this one-day interactive and practical event exploring how we could work collaboratively in local places to improve everyone’s experiences of end of life, for everyone’s benefit.

In this conference you’ll hear from people within healthcare systems on how they have made changes, and hear from local community leaders on what good partnerships look like to them, and what more equitable relationships and resource might look like.

The emphasis of the day will be creating a space for learning together – helping people exchange helpful, practical ideas and conversation about how we can think about relationships, initiatives and co-working styles for local and place-based working.

  • An interactive day where you’ll hear from people making change or helping you consider how you might do this
  • An opportunity to take part in discussions and form plans
  • Interactive and training workshops
  • A chance to be part of an experiential Be Happy Be Sad party

So join us if you’re interested in

  • changing the way, you think about community potential and thinking about where to start
  • practical workshops that help you gain new skills
  • developing the confidence to make your existing work more change-focused or equitable
  • learning about how non-medical methods can help tackle over-medicalisation and support people’s wellbeing.

Join us if you work in an organisation in any healthcare setting supporting people at the end of life, and you recognise a need for change:

  • how and why communities and people with lived experience have a leadership role to play
  • the value of collaboration and community power, and
  • how you might more equitably work with communities
  • what skills and methods are involved
  • how and where to start.
TimeSession TitleSpeaker
9.30Arrival and Registration 
10.00Welcome and Introduction to the dayConference Chair:  Dr Mary Hodgson, Head of Community Action & Learning, St Christopher’s CARE
10.10Unleashing the Power of CommunitiesDaniel Farag, Director of Innovation & Practice, The Young Foundation
10.30Without the soft stuff the hard stuff gets harderDr Guy Peryer, National Institute for Health and Care Research
10.50A hosted conversation – what makes a good community-based relationship?
In conversation with guests from Croydon’s voluntary sector
Malcolm Gill, Croydon Death Literacy Project Coordinator
11.20Morning break 
11.35Why we get involved to make change happen – hearing from local volunteers
In conversation with local volunteers
Rebecca Nellis, Compassionate Neighbours Coordinator
12:05Death and Dying in the Queer FamilyPolly Maxwell, Queer Social Researcher
12.20Unboxing CommunityRekha Vijayshankar, Deputy Head of Quality & Clinical Governance, Marie Curie UK  
12.50Lunch (provided) 
13.35Workshops 
 1. Nature as exploration of death as part of life: environment and existentialism

2. On Power and Pedagogy: De-institutionalising knowledge through community learning

3. Listening as part of dialogue: Bearing witness to difficult times and considering change
Facilitated by Anthea Moys, Loren Seaman, Jack Emsden, Emma Woodhouse, Akvile Gaile and Melissa Fielding, members of the St Christopher’s Community Action Team  
15.05Afternoon break 
15.20  The Be Happy Be Sad Experience brought to you by members of Croydon MencapJointly hosted by members of Croydon Mencap and Toby Kilby Pollard, Community Artist
16.05Reflections 
16.30Close

In the afternoon, take part in workshops helping you develop skills or think about how your skills are transferrable to new settings:

Nature as exploration of death as part of life: environment and existentialism

  • In this outdoor workshop we’ll use the starting point of nature, flora and fauna to consider what seasonality can help us understand about existential questions
  • We’ll also consider how ecological concerns and changing climates shape uncertainty in our lives and how we might help people consider the big issues affecting us all.

NB. If you would like to attend this workshop, dress for the weather, not the conference!

On Power and Pedagogy: De-institutionalising knowledge through community learning

  • In this workshop we’ll consider how different learning styles, such as peer learning, can help us change the way we perceive end of life, and also think about who has knowledge to share about it.
  • We’ll help you think about how peer learning styles can de-institutionalise and be part of de-medicalising the end of life.

Listening as part of dialogue: Bearing witness to difficult times and considering change

  • In this workshop we’ll focus on how listening skills and asking people what is going on for them can be the basis of a long – lasting relationship based on mutual concerns.
  • This workshop will help you understand and contextualise end of life in community concerns and settings, as well as opportunities.

Experience: how death literacy can be playful without losing its emotional resonance

  • In this workshop we’ll recreate a party co-created with participants from Croydon MENCAP to help them explore end of life questions and feelings.
  • In a set of party games and conversation starters, we’ll help you consider how play and arts can be part of expanding our imagination about end of life and holding meaningful conversations, or multiple feelings at the same time.
Dr Guy Peryer

Dr Guy Peryer

Dr Guy Peryer is a chartered psychologist and a chartered scientist. He studied the psychology of music for his master’s degree and went on to complete a PhD in applied psychology and complex systems…
Read More Dr Guy Peryer
Rekha Vijayshankar, Registered Nurse.

Rekha Vijayshankar

Rekha is an experienced palliative care nurse, a specialist public health nurse and a nurse prescriber. She has held leadership positions across Primary Care, Community Nursing and Social Care. She…
Read More Rekha Vijayshankar
White woman with blond hair pulled back into one smiling with red lipstick.

Mary Hodgson

Head of Community Action & Learning/CARE Co-Lead, St Christopher’s Hospice. Mary is an experienced community facilitator and researcher, and is interested in how people understand societal challenges and want to…
Read More Mary Hodgson
Toby Kilby-Pollard headshot

Toby Kilby-Pollard

Toby is an artist and facilitator with a background in socially-engaged curatorial practice within galleries and museums. He works as Community Artist as part of the Community Action Team at…
Read More Toby Kilby-Pollard
Anthea Moys headshot

Anthea Moys 

Anthea, born in apartheid South Africa, brings a rich background in the arts and a PhD in community, play, and power for social change to her role as a Community…
Read More Anthea Moys 
Akvile Gailes

Akvile Gaile

Akvile has been a volunteer for the Compassionate Neighbours project and Bereavement Help Point host for four years. During this time, she learned that her lived experiences inform how she…
Read More Akvile Gaile
Melissa Fielding

Melissa Fielding 

Melissa is an academic and researcher working as part of the Community Action Team at St Christopher’s Hospice. She holds a PhD in Political Geography from the University of Cambridge,…
Read More Melissa Fielding 
Malcolm Gill

Malcolm Gill

Malcolm works in the Community Action Team as the Project Coordinator on the Croydon Death Literary project where he develops significant partnerships with a wide range of community groups and organisations, whose…
Read More Malcolm Gill
Jack Emsden

Jack Emsden 

Jack works in the Community Action Team as a Community Learning Facilitator. They are also a practicing poet. They support people in community settings to share and learn from their…
Read More Jack Emsden 
Rebecca Nellis

Rebecca Nellis

Rebecca has been part of the Community Action Team for over 3 and a half years, coordinating the Compassionate Neighbours project. She has built on her own volunteering experience and…
Read More Rebecca Nellis
Emma Woodhouse

Emma Woodhouse

Emma holds the position of Community Action Programme Manager at St Christopher’s, partnering and collaborating with communities to find ways to respond to societal need and create change. Emma graduated…
Read More Emma Woodhouse

Teach with CARE – improve your teaching practice

  • Are you passionate about teaching in health and social care?
  • Do you want to fine tune your teaching practice?
  • Would you like to introduce innovations in your approach to learning?  

Teach with CARE is a four-day course combining online and in person teaching spread over several weeks.

The course considers different perspectives of adult learning and pedagogy.

The sessions introduce best practice techniques including planning; presenting; resourcing; questioning; assessing and evaluating teaching across the four days.

Learners will also look at online educational tools for effective teaching as well as evaluating best practice for face-to-face and online teaching. They will have the opportunity to plan and share a short teaching session and receive supportive feedback.

Please note you will need to bring a laptop to each session. Do let us know if you are unable to do this.

It’s common to be asked to teach others as part of your role, but for those with no training and little experience in teaching, this can be a nerve-wracking prospect. Teach with CARE has been developed as a foundational step into the theory and practice of teaching and learning, giving clinical and non-clinical colleagues alike the confidence and ideas to excel in the role. High quality teaching is critical to our learners being able to put what we teach into practice, and therefore benefits the quality of care delivered throughout the sector.

Matt Tregellas, Learning Technologist and Teach with CARE Lead, St Christopher’s CARE

“I really enjoyed the four days. I think that Teach with CARE should be mandatory for all (teaching colleagues), no matter how long they have been teaching. It gives everyone a platform from which they can be launched and a sense of what is expected of them.” 

Teach with CARE attendee

What will the course look like?

This course will involve:

  • Online (days 2 and 3) and face-to-face (days 1 and 4) learning
  • Exploration of academic and web articles
  • A range of activity types including: live and video presentation; using interactive tools as both a learner and a teacher; discussion; pair and group work; self-study; critical thinking; reflection
  • Completion of tasks before and after sessions. There will be approximately one hour of self-study per session and slightly longer for the final assignment.

What will I learn?

  • Theories of teaching and learning
  • Consider the needs of adult learners and how to create engaging learning
  • Consider implications for practice when teaching face-to-face or virtually
  • Enhance and develop teaching practice

Who is it for?

The course is for anyone who wishes to improve their teaching practice face-to-face and online, particularly those in health and social care, but the learning from this course can be used in most settings.

Delegates are expected to have a basic understanding of navigating a laptop, supporting software and use of the internet.

Matthew Tregellas

Matt Tregellas

After graduating from the University of Sheffield, Matt moved to Japan where he began his career as an English language teacher. After three years, Matt returned to the UK where…
Read More Matt Tregellas
Deborah Holman

Deborah Holman

Deborah Holman has been working at St Christopher’s since 2002 in clinical practice, in care homes and in education. For 8 years prior to this she worked closely with St Christopher’s…
Read More Deborah Holman

Programme

  • Exploring St Christopher’s CARE aims and Pedagogical Framework
  • Considering different perspectives on adult learning
  • Planning; presenting; resourcing; questioning; assessing and evaluating teaching in response to learner input and feedback
  • Considering best practice for face-to-face and online teaching
  • Using online tools for effective teaching
  • Planning and sharing the rationale for a teaching session

Day 1

10.00Welcome and Introductions
St Christopher’s CARE and the Pedagogical Framework
11.00Break
11.15Theories of learning
12.15Lunch
12.55Adult learning and active learning
14.15Reflection, evaluation and wrap up
15.00Close

Day 2

10.00The teaching context
11.15Break
11.30Constructive alignment, learning outcomes and Bloom’s taxonomy
12.40Lunch
13.20Online educational tools
14.20Homework set up and reflection
15.00Close

Day 3

10.00The Conversational Framework
Active learning activity share
11.15Break
11.30Anatomy of a teaching session
Planning a teaching session
12.40Lunch
13.20Flipped learning
13.50Multimedia design
14.30Homework set up and reflection
15.00Close

Day 4

10.00Evaluation and reflection
11.15Break
11.30Making and delivering an activity with educational technology
12.45Lunch
13.25Putting it into practice: Assignment workshop
14.15Final reflection, Next steps
15.00Farewell

Community of Practice for Activity Coordinators (HELP Care Home Partners)

Come and join us for our Community of Practice, a place to learn and grow together, developing new skills through evidenced-based education, equipping you in your practice to help improve the quality of the life of your residents.

Email education@stchristophers.org.uk to find out more. New dates will be confirmed soon.

Outline

Next session: dates to be confirmed

This is part of a year long Community of Activity Coordinators supporting each other in their roles and developing the support that they offer to residents. You are welcome to join us at any point during the year and we will provide you any information that you might need.

In previous sessions the group has enjoyed the discussions and opportunity to meet other people in similar roles across a variety of homes.

We have spent some time exploring someone’s identity and how we can support that as well as the effects of bed rest and inactivity. We explored the wonderful work that you, as Activity Coordinators, are doing to enhance peoples lives and maintain their capacity physically, mentally, socially and emotionally. We also looked at the challenges that you face in your roles and over the next few sessions we will explore how we can take positive steps to over come the challenges, taking inspiration from each other and problem solving as a group.

Who is it for?

This community is open to Activity Coordinators based in homes that are signed up as one of our HELP Care Home Partners.

Our HELP Care Home Partners are entitled to free HELP educational care home initiatives run by St Christopher’s and Greenwich & Bexley Community Hospice.

Find out more about Help for Care Homes

White woman with wavy brown hair smiling in a blue shirt.

Gail Preston

Gail has a wide ranging experience in Physiotherapy, coming to work at St Christopher’s in 2011. She has been involved in all aspects of Rehabilitation at St Christopher’s including developing the Living Well at Home Team (goal focused rehabilitation using volunteers). She was part of the Wellbeing team through recent COVID-19 pandemic, translating in-person services online and then back again in a new design. She is currently working clinically in outpatient rehab and as part of the Professional Learning team helping to deliver webinars, workshops, communities and the 2023 Multi Professional Academy week.
Read full profile Gail Preston

Newly Qualified Nurses and Paramedics Community of Practice

We have created a community of practice for newly qualified nurses and paramedics. This online group offers a supportive environment to explore experiences and questions relating to palliative care. The sessions will also include contributions and presentations from a range of palliative care specialists. The aim is to help participants master the principles and practice of palliative and end of life care. This will create a cohort of new healthcare professionals, who are confident to support patients and families affected by life-limiting illness.

We’ve been able to establish the community, thanks to the support of Dr Tyrrell Evans and his daughter Isabel. In March 2020 retired nurse, Siân Evans, Tyrrell’s wife and Isabel’s mother, died aged 69 after many months of care and support from St Christopher’s. Read their story here.

Grateful for the exceptional care the whole family received, Tyrrell and Isabel decided they wanted to create a legacy for Siân. They set up a fund to support nursing education and training in palliative and end of life care.

What will I learn?

The last session (online): Tuesday 23rd April 4-6pm

Over the course of the monthly sessions members of the community can expect to achieve:

  • A better understanding of the principles of quality end of life care

  • Greater confidence in delivering quality end of life care and communicating about death and dying

  • Increased understanding of the role of hospice and palliative care in supporting people who are dying or bereaved

  • Greater resilience and a shared sense of pastoral support
 Please note that if you join the community at this stage you will have access to recordings of all previous sessions on our online learning platform.

Who is it for?

  • Nurses working in any setting, up to five years post qualification or registration
  • Newly Qualified Nurses working in hospices, the community, acute sector, primary care and care homes
  • Paramedics
Karen Duckworth

Karen Duckworth

Karen is a Clinical Nurse Specialist at St Christopher’s Hospice, caring for those at end of life in the Bromley community.  She has recently started a secondment within CARE as a visiting lecturer and facilitates the ECHOs for Bromley and Croydon mental health and learning disability homes.  Karen has worked as a palliative care nurse since 2014. Her experience includes both community and in-patient settings. She has had the privilege to work with many patients, and their families, as they face life-limiting illness. For Karen, the holistic nature of palliative care work has driven her passion for the specialty. Karen enjoys sharing…
Read full profile Karen Duckworth

What will the course look like?

This community will provide opportunities for shared learning, continuous development and pastoral support for a national network of newly qualified nurses and paramedics including, we hope, you. It will provide you with an introduction to the art and science of nursing in end of life care, and the principles of palliative and end of life care.

Members of the community will be expected to develop and co-design the 10 monthly two-hour sessions which will feature input from professionals and experts by experience.

As part of the community you will have access to our Online Learning Platform which will have all the resources from each session.

Palliative Care for People with Advanced Dementia

As a health or social care professional supporting people at the end of life, do you feel confident and competent to support and care for people with advanced dementia and their carers?

As part of a whole new learning programme here at St Christopher’s CARE to upskill clinicians and colleagues working in all settings to better understand and support the growing number of people with dementia at the end of life, we’ve created this three-day course.

And, to meet the needs of people with busy working schedules and different areas of interest and expertise, this has been designed to be a flexible course. That means learners may complete all three days, any two, or just the one that most suits their needs.

You can choose to attend all 3 days or whichever one suits your needs.

What will I learn?

25th April or 19th September (both virtual)

Day One Topic: Common Symptoms in People Living with Advanced Dementia

  • Dementia: pathophysiology, aetiology and key symptoms
  • How to support people displaying distressed and adaptive behaviours
  • How to recognise and managing pain in people living with dementia
  • How to recognise delirium in people living with dementia
  • Discuss dementia case scenarios
Helen Scott

Helen Scott

Helen is an Independent Nurse Lecturer specialising in palliative and end-of-life care and dementia. She is a Visiting Lecturer for St Christopher’s Hospice, London, and an Associate Trainer for Dementia…
Read More Helen Scott

What will I learn?

13th June or 7th November (both virtual)

Day Two Topic: Key palliative care issues relating to people with advanced dementia and their carers

This study day – the second in our three-part palliative care and dementia series – will highlight some of the important palliative care issues relating to people with advanced dementia and their loved ones. The goals of the day are to help learners:

  • Be more familiar with the signs and symptoms that dementia is progressing and of the last 6-12 months of life
  • Understand the importance of end-of-life planning to prevent crisis admissions to the hospital
  • Recognise and address ways in which dementia may impact on nutritional intake
  • Be more aware of how people with advanced dementia process and cope with grief and loss and how best to support them and their families talk about grief and loss
  • Understand that services can be developed to support people with advanced dementia stay at home for as long as possible
  • Know the stressors associated with caring for someone with dementia at the end of life.
Helen Scott

Helen Scott

Helen is an Independent Nurse Lecturer specialising in palliative and end-of-life care and dementia. She is a Visiting Lecturer for St Christopher’s Hospice, London, and an Associate Trainer for Dementia…
Read More Helen Scott
Tracey Carter

Tracey Carter

Tracey Carter is an Registered Mental Nurse with over 35 years experience within the mental health arena, the last 15 years having been specifically within the Dementia Care field. Tracey…
Read More Tracey Carter
Monica Crugel

Dr Monica Crugel

Dr Monica Crugel has more than 20 years’ experience in psychiatry and specialises in the care of older adults and people with dementia. She was a research fellow in a…
Read More Dr Monica Crugel
Helen King

Helen King

Helen is a Consultant Nurse at St Christopher’s. Helen joined St Christopher’s in 2019 to work on embedding the Age Attuned Palliative Care project – this work continued during the…
Read More Helen King
Shafika Banoo

Shafika Banoo

Shafika currently works at St Christopher’s Hospice as a clinical fellow in the IPU. Shafika previously worked in India as a consultant in the city of Chennai in India for…
Read More Shafika Banoo
Maria Aparicio

Maria Aparicio

Maria has worked as a Clinical Nurse Specialist in Palliative Care with St Christopher’s Hospice in the Community team in 2018. For two years she joined the St Christopher’s Centre…
Read More Maria Aparicio

What will I learn?

18th July 2024 (in person at St Christopher’s CARE) or 16th January 2025 (virtual)

Day Three Topic: Communicating with people living with advanced dementia and their loved ones

  • Understand the different ways in which individuals with dementia communicate
  • Understand communication barriers and factors that can affect communication in a negative way
  • Be aware that non-verbal communication is an essential component of communication for people living with dementia

This course is pitched at an intermediate level and is suitable for nurses, doctors, social workers, occupational therapists, paramedics, physiotherapists and speech and language therapists.

Principles and Practice of Palliative and End of Life Care for Registered Nurses, Nursing Associates and Allied Health Professionals

Outline

The COVID-19 pandemic brought into sharp focus the importance of end of life care, across all settings.

This three-day introduction provides all registered nurses, nursing associates and allied health professionals, with the essential building blocks to support patients and their families at the end of life, in the community, acute hospitals, primary care, hospices, prisons and care homes.

Attendees will have the opportunity to discuss, evaluate and increase their knowledge, skills and confidence in relation to end of life care.

This is course consists of three in-person days at St Christopher’s CARE in Sydenham, London.

You will be provided with access to our Online Learning Platform which will be available for three months for you to view resources from the course.

What will I learn?

On completion of this course you will:

  • Have increased confidence and skills in end of life care
  • Be aware of national and local resources and services available
  • Explore barriers and difficulties that may be encountered at a personal, professionals and service level
  • Develop communication skills and confidence to deal with challenging questions around dying
  • Develop skills in symptom and pain control
  • Identify areas for development within your own practice and apply learning from the course to optimise those areas.

On completion of the course you will receive a certificate of attendance.

Who is it for?

This course is aimed at all Registered Nurses, Nursing Associates and Allied Health Professionals working in any setting.

Attendees from the November 2023 course gave this feedback:

“[The teachers] were very knowledgeable and delivered the training with utmost passion for the course.”

“Very knowledgeable and was very helpful. Has changed my mindset of palliative care.”

“Very interactive”

“Keep up the good work in imparting knowledge that will have a great impact on how professionals give care.”

We also run a two-day course for health and social care assistants.

Supported by visiting lecturers and clinicians

Deborah Holman

Deborah Holman

Deborah Holman has been working at St Christopher’s since 2002 in clinical practice, in care homes and in education. For 8 years prior to this she worked closely with St Christopher’s as a district nurse with a keen interest in caring for people who chose to die at home. From 2012 – 2019 Deborah, alongside others set up St Christopher’s Personal Care Service and worked as the Registered Manager delivering integrated health and social care in people’s homes to those who were frail elderly, having long term conditions and those in the last year of life. Deborah has been involved in…
Read full profile Deborah Holman

Principles and Practice of Palliative and End of Life Care for Health and Social Care Assistants

This two-day course provides Health and Social Care Assistants working in any setting with the essential building blocks to support patients and their families at the end of life

What will the course look like?

This two-day introduction provides all health and social care assistants with the essential building blocks to support patients and their families at the end of life, in the community, acute hospitals, primary care and care homes.

Attendees will have the opportunity to discuss, evaluate and increase their knowledge, skills and confidence in end of life care.

Our Online Learning Platform will be available for three months for you with all resources from the 2 days.

What will I learn?

On completion of this course you will:

  • Have increased confidence and skills in end of life care
  • Be aware of national and local resources and services available
  • Explore barriers and difficulties that may be encountered at a personal, professionals and service level
  • Develop communication skills and confidence to deal with challenging questions around dying
  • Develop skills in symptom and pain control.

On completion of the course you will receive a certificate of attendance.

Who is it for?

This course is suitable for all health and social care assistants working in any setting.

The first day of this course is free for HELP Care Home Partners.

Karen Duckworth

Karen Duckworth

Karen is a Clinical Nurse Specialist at St Christopher’s Hospice, caring for those at end of life in the Bromley community.  She has recently started a secondment within CARE as…
Read More Karen Duckworth

Leadership & Management Course for Speciality Trainees and SAS Doctors in Palliative Medicine

The leadership and management course for speciality doctors and SAS doctors in palliative medicine has been running since 2003, and we have now trained over 480 doctors from the United Kingdom and Ireland.

You will build effective management knowledge, skills and abilities and enhance your practical management skills. The course content is designed to address the majority of relevant speciality training curriculum requirements.

Feedback from attendees is overwhelmingly positive, and most who come do so because of recommendations from previous course members. The maximum number of participants for any courses is 28 to optimise learning.

The course is appropriate for ST5 end/ST6/SSAS or early consultants in palliative medicine.

Palliative And End Of Life Care Foundations

This module for registered nurses has been developed collaboratively between St Christopher’s and the Florence Nightingale Faculty of Nursing, Midwifery and Palliative Care at King’s College London (KCL) and can be taken as a 15-credit standalone module at Level 6 (degree level) or as an optional module for the BSc programme.

This module explores the principles of palliative and end of life care, as applied in all care settings (hospices, acute hospitals, care homes and the community). It aims to equip nurses with the skills to complete an initial and ongoing assessment of the needs of a patient requiring palliative or end of life care, with regard to their physical, psychological, spiritual and cultural well-being. It will also explore and analyse the needs of the ‘family’ and the role of the nurse and multi-professional team in meeting these needs.

New dates tbc, please contact King’s for further information (details below).

Applications

For more information about this course and how to apply visit the King’s website or contact Dr Karen Gillett, E mail: Karen.Gillett@kcl.ac.uk

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